Tuesday, June 30, 2015

Gahan now open to covert art discussions, but still no public comment on two-way streets.

This quote moved me -- from the sofa to the fridge for another beer.

“I certainly don’t like to see not just Mr. Wimmer, but any artist, leave New Albany,” (Mayor Jeff Gahan) said. “We are certainly open to discussions on how we can bring quality art projects here.”

Now, in a world exclusive NAC SPY CAM VIDEO, follow the top-secret, down-low City Hall route artists must take to find the meeting room where these "open" discussions typically take place.



Communication. Rinse and repeat.

Yo, Michael: I'll come visit in Jeffersonville. Cheers!

Artistic differences: Wimmer leaving New Albany after disagreement over artwork, by Daniel Suddeath (N and T)

Michael Wimmer paints a dreary picture of New Albany’s appreciation for public arts.

There’s a desire within the community to see more works, the artist and owner of WE Studio said Friday, but city officials have made the task of installing public art cumbersome, Wimmer said.

“I’m an artist. Of course I love art. I love to see it. But it also brings tourism in, especially to a downtown area like this,” he said.

Wimmer plans to soon close his East Main Street studio in New Albany and move it to an undisclosed location in Jeffersonville, where he is already taking part in multiple public art projects.

His reasons for leaving stem from a series of guessing games he said the New Albany administration played with him about two sizable art projects.

1 comment:

Michael Ladd said...

“I certainly don’t like to see not just Mr. Wimmer, but any artist, leave New Albany,” (Mayor Jeff Gahan) said. “We are certainly open to discussions on how we can bring quality art projects here.”

Really? You had a "quality art project" here, Jeff. Until you screwed it up!

You have forgotten the public arts project started nine years ago by the Carnegie Museum of Art and History and the Urban Enterprise Association that you destroyed and abandoned when you and your minion, Duggins, terminated the independent UEA and its many positive community programs.

The public arts program was recognized by three states arts programs: Indiana, Kentucky and Ohio. Because of the local project, public art became a priority for Jeffersonville and Louisville in particular. In fact, because of the local project, public art in the region became fashionable regionally.

So Jeff, it's a little disingenuous for you to claim you are "open to discussions" about bringing quality art projects to the community. You already had those projects in town, but you abandoned them. Another success for the Gahan administration.